21st Annual Critics’ Choice Awards Nominees Announced! – Plus Commentary On Some ‘Snubs’ From A BFCA Member

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Award season has sprung, and now the Critics’ Choice Awards are adding to the fun with the release of their list of nominees.

As you hopefully know by now, the CCAs have combined the Critics’ Choice Movie Awards and the Critics’ Choice Television Awards into one fantastic event showcasing the talents of those involved in the work of both big and small screens.

Everyone’s favorite game is to talk about what was snubbed and/or who got nominated that didn’t deserve it, and GoldDerby has already put out a list of some of the more notable snubs from the CCAs, and I thought I might as well comment on those snubs. As a voting member of both the BFCA and BTJA, it’s hard to avoid that conversation, so I might as well just put my thoughts out there.

I’m only going to go through film here though, because television has too much to deal with, and the snub cacophony hasn’t taken off yet.

Get the full list and press release below, and I’ll add GoldDerby info and comments beneath each category. *GoldDerby‘s listed snubs are – “Not Nominated”

Also, obviously, got to criticschoice.com often.


 

 

MAD MAX: FURY ROAD LEADS WITH 13 NOMINATIONS FOR THE 21ST ANNUAL CRITICS’ CHOICE AWARDS

CAROL, THE MARTIAN, AND THE REVENANT ALSO TOP CONTENDERS WITH NINE NOMINATIONS EACH

ABC, FX NETWORKS, AND HBO LEAD WITH 14 TELEVISION NOMINATIONS EACH FARGO LEADS ALL SERIES WITH EIGHT TELEVISION NOMINATIONS

AWARDS GALA WILL BROADCAST LIVE ON A&E, LIFETIME AND LMN FROM THE BARKER HANGAR IN SANTA MONICA JANUARY 17TH AT 8PM ET/ 5 PM PT

HOSTED BY T.J. MILLER

The Broadcast Film Critics Association (BFCA) and Broadcast Television Journalists Association (BTJA) have announced the nominees for The 21st Annual Critics’ Choice Awards. The winners will be revealed live at the star-studded Critics’ Choice Awards gala, which will be broadcast from the Barker Hangar in Santa Monica on A&E, Lifetime and LMN on Sunday, January 17 at 8PM ET/ 5PM PT immediately following “Critics’ Choice Red Carpet Live” on A&E at 7PM ET/4PM PT. As previously announced, actor and comedian T.J. Miller will serve as the show’s host.

“Mad Max: Fury Road” leads this year with 13 nominations including Best Picture, Charlize Theron for both Best Actress and Best Actress In An Action Movie, Tom Hardy for Best Actor In An Action Movie, George Miller for Best Director, Best Cinematography, Best Production Design, Best Editing, Best Costume Design, Best Hair and Makeup, Best Visual Effects, Best Action Movie, and Best Sci-Fi/Horror Movie.

“Carol,” “The Martian,” and “The Revenant” impressed with nine nominations each, all in the running for Best Picture, Best Director, and Best Cinematography, among others. “Spotlight” earned eight nominations, followed by “The Big Short” with seven, and “The Hateful Eight” with six. “Bridge of Spies,” “Brooklyn,” “The Danish Girl,” “Jurassic World,” and “Sicario” each garnered five nominations and “Room” earned four.

Jennifer Lawrence is up for three awards, for her work in both “Joy” and “The Hunger Games: Mockingjay – Part 2,” while Tom Hardy and Charlize Theron are both nominated for two acting awards. Rachel McAdams is up for two awards as well, garnering nominations for her film work in “Spotlight”, and her television work in True Detective.

In the television race, ABC, FX Networks, and HBO lead with 14 nominations each, followed by FOX with 12. Topping the list of nominated series is Fargo (FX Networks) with eight. The Leftovers (HBO) and Transparent (Amazon) follow closely behind with six each. The Wiz Live! (NBC) garnered five nominations, while Black-ish (ABC), Mr. Robot (USA), and Penny Dreadful (Showtime) each earned four. Other top series with multiple nominations include American Horror Story: Hotel (FX Networks), Empire (FOX), Jane The Virgin (The CW), Luther (BBC America), Rectify (Sundance), Saints & Strangers (National Geographic Channel), Show Me A Hero (HBO), The Knick (Cinemax), UnREAL (Lifetime), and You’re The Worst (FX Networks), all with three nominations, and Chopped (Food Network), Fresh Off The Boat (ABC), Getting On (HBO), Hannibal (NBC), Inside The Actors Studio (Bravo), Master of None (Netflix), Mom (CBS), Nashville (ABC), Survivor (CBS), The Amazing Race (CBS), The Grinder (FOX), The Last Man on Earth (FOX), and The Middle (ABC), all with two. Because of the new combined Critics’ Choice Awards format, only television shows airing primarily within the seven months from June 1 – December 31 were eligible for nomination.

“This is a new Golden Age in Hollywood, with a dazzling array of spectacular, delightful and illuminating films and programs to choose from,” says BFCA/BTJA President Joey Berlin. “These nominations not only honor extraordinary achievements but they serve as an incredibly helpful guide to the best of the best for viewers and ticket buyers. We always tell the creative community, show us your best work and we’ll help the world find it – and that’s what we’re doing today.”

“The Critics’ Choice Awards” are bestowed annually by the BFCA and BTJA to honor the finest in cinematic and television achievement. The BFCA is the largest film critics’ organization in the United States and Canada, representing more than 300 television, radio and online critics. BFCA members are the primary source of information for today’s film-going public. BTJA is the collective voice of almost 100 journalists who regularly cover television for TV viewers, radio listeners and online audiences. Historically, the “Critics’ Choice Awards” are the most accurate predictor of the Academy Award nominations.
A&E Networks partnered with the Broadcast Film Critics Association (BFCA) and the Broadcast Television Journalists Association (BTJA) to become the exclusive home to the 2015 “Critics’ Choice Movie Awards” and “Critics’ Choice Television Awards.” That partnership continues in 2016, with the newly formatted three-hour ceremony that brings together both sets of accolades, and for years to come.

“The 21st Annual Critics’ Choice Awards” will be produced by Bob Bain Productions and Berlin Entertainment. BFCA/BTJA are represented by WME and Dan Black of Greenberg Traurig.

 

Follow the 21st Annual Critics’ Choice Awards on Twitter and Instagram @CriticsChoice and on Facebook/CriticsChoiceAwards.

 

NOMINATIONS FOR THE 21st ANNUAL CRITICS’ CHOICE AWARDS


 

MOVIE


 

BEST PICTURE

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NOT NOMINATED: Best Picture
Steve Jobs
The Hateful Eight
Joy
Straight Outta Compton
Inside Out

The key snubs here, and the ones that will be mentioned frequently, are the first three, though they’ve all been nominated (or won) elsewhere, whether that’s the Golden Globes, other Critic lists, etc. I actually thought Inside Out might make it, and it deserves it, if you ask me, but this was a busy year, and having the Animated category always makes that move a bit more tricky.

Though these snubs might seem like a big deal, as I said, it was a busy year for movies jockeying for this, and even though there are ten nominees, Joy and Steve Jobs didn’t universally win over critics. In fact, Joy isn’t doing that well as far as the movie itself. The Hateful Eight is a strong movie, but it also goes a little weird, and probably won’t be on that many Top 10 lists, so it’s understandable. Straight Outta Compton is in a similar place. Some loved it, and it’s a solid film, but it didn’t get the highest marks from critics as a whole.

Still, if there is some room to move things around, Bridge of Spies and Sicario only performed about as well as these others among critics, so they could easily have been traded out. I guess that’s just the way the chips fell on nomination day.

 

BEST ACTOR

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NOT NOMINATED: Best Actor
Will Smith, “Concussion
Michael Caine, “Youth
Tom Hanks, “Bridge of Spies
Samuel L. Jackson, “The Hateful Eight
Michael B. Jordan, “Creed

This category is something of a mess, and not mentioned in either group is Ian McKellan, who absolutely deserved the nod for Mr. Holmes. Will Smith got the Golden Globe nod, and I don’t think he deserved it, so it doesn’t make this a snub really. Michael Caine should have got it, and I’m not so sure Johnny Depp deserves the nod, so those could be switched out. Depp is good, but not great. Beyond that, saying Tom Hanks made a movie, and Tom Hanks should get nominated, are getting too close together for me. He’s good in this one, but I wasn’t blown away by him. I could go either way on Matt Damon though, because I could say the same. Samuel L. Jackson was great, so he could take over for Depp or Damon, but Michael B. Jordan was never seriously in the running.

 

BEST ACTRESS

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NOT NOMINATED: Best Actress
Carey Mulligan, “Suffragette
Lily Tomlin, “Grandma
Amy Schumer, “Trainwreck
Emily Blunt, “Sicario”
Maggie Smith, “The Lady in the Van

I don’t think any of these really rise to the level of a snub, and are only mentioned because they were nominated for Golden Globes. You have to remember that the GGs have two sets of nominees. The Critics’ Choice has Comedy categories, and we take them a little more seriously than the GGs (usually), and that’s where you’ll find Amy Schumer, but she isn’t actually in the running here. As far as the other actresses mentioned, I don’t think any of them have any serious shot at knocking anyone else off the list, with the possible exception of Charlize Theron. She was very good, and had a lot of people talking at the beginning of the year, but is it really a performance worthy of a nomination? Maybe, but it’s one that you could at least talk about.

The rest of them aren’t really performances you want to question. The true choice here for a potential snub is Emily Blunt, who was awesome, but you have to figure out who she knocks off, and Theron is the only possibility.

 

BEST SUPPORTING ACTOR

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NOT NOMINATED: Best Supporting Actor
Michael Keaton, “Spotlight”
Idris Elba, “Beasts of No Nation
Benicio Del Toro, “Sicario”
Jacob Tremblay, “Room”
Joel Edgerton, “Black Mass”

Supporting is always weird, and this year is no different. The whole theory of the category brings up a lot of questions, so finding a strange set of nominees is just par for the course. The real snubs here, the roles worthy of noting as possibly being snubs, are Michael Keaton and Idris Elba. Elba has gotten the nom pretty consistently, so it is a little odd that he didn’t get it.

Keaton is in a bit of a different boat. He absolutely deserves it, but sometimes a movie doesn’t fit into the thought process well, and for certain awards the studios decide who is potentially nominated for what category. In this case, putting Keaton as supporting may have monkeyed with people’s thoughts.

Del Toro could also be considered a snub, and I agree to a certain extent, but people aren’t going to complain as much. Tremblay is a bit of a stretch, and though Edgerton was great, I don’t think he was seriously in the running, especially when you have to rule out the other snubs, and the people who did get the nod. There are only so many spaces.

All that said, of the people who did get the nod, only Shannon, Dano, and Hardy are locks, and in that order. Ruffalo’s nod really should have gone to Keaton, if the film is going to get one. I like Ruffalo a lot, but in this film he wasn’t as good as Keaton by a long shot, and that makes no sense as a nom. Rylance is good, but his spot could easily go to any of the serious snubs. Stallone, despite also being nominated for the GGs, is something of a joke nomination, as is the critical outpouring of love for the film in general. It’s not that good in general, and even if Stallone is a lot better than you expect, there’s no way he’s better than anyone on the lists here of noms and snubs. Everyone on the list of snubs is more deserving, and at least ten or twelve other people this year besides.

 

BEST SUPPORTING ACTRESS

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courtesy The Weinstein Company

  • Jennifer Jason Leigh – The Hateful Eight
  • Rooney Mara – Carol
  • Rachel McAdams – Spotlight
  • Helen Mirren – Trumbo
  • Alicia Vikander – The Danish Girl
  • Kate Winslet – Steve Jobs

NOT NOMINATED: Best Supporting Actress
Jane Fonda, “Youth”
Kristen Stewart, “Clouds of Sils Maria”
Elizabeth Banks, “Love and Mercy”
Joan Allen, “Room”
Alicia Vikander, “Ex Machina”

Again, it’s a weird category. I don’t think anything here is really a snub, though the other roles are largely worthy of note, but the one most likely to get mentioned is the one that is most odd. Jane Fonda got the GG nom for Youth, but it’s ridiculous. She’s in the movie for a very brief few minutes, which is one conversation, and she isn’t that great, and it’s a movie in which everyone else is so much better than her that it is jarringly noticeable.

People will definitely mention Alicia Vikander, even if only for the curiosity. She got the GG nom for Ex Machina, and now gets the CCA nom for The Danish Girl. Here’s the oddity of the category. If you compared nothing but those two movies, and came away thinking the acting nod should be for Ex Machina, as opposed to The Danish Girl, well, you’ve gone goofy, to be honest. She’s good in Ex Machina, but she’s amazing in The Danish Girl.

As I said, the rest are good performances, but I’m not sure we’re seriously talking snubs here.

 

BEST YOUNG ACTOR/ACTRESS

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Abraham Attah – Beasts of No Nation
RJ Cyler – Me and Earl and the Dying Girl
Shameik Moore – Dope
Milo Parker – Mr. Holmes
Jacob Tremblay – Room

No one’s going to complain about a snub here, since it’s our own, unique award, but people are going to complain about whichever actor wins.

I love that we have this award, but I would like it more if getting nominated for Actor, or Supporting Actor, would disqualify you from it.

The race is pretty solidly between Tremblay and Attah, and Attah is, I think, most likely to win.

 

BEST ACTING ENSEMBLE

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  • The Big Short
  • The Hateful Eight
  • Spotlight
  • Straight Outta Compton
  • Trumbo

NOT NOMINATED: Best Ensemble
“Steve Jobs”
“Joy”
“The Martian”
“The Revenant”
“Carol”

This is not only a category that can get a little screwy, but talking about snubs is generally pretty screwy as well. There are “things that might have been nominated,” but a snub here is complicated without a movie that just screams for it. I don’t think any on the “not nominated” list do, even if I could see some of them getting nominated. It’s just not that sort of category. Had Spotlight not been nominated, then we could talk snub, but barring that…

 

BEST DIRECTOR

Carol Movie Blanchett

courtesy The Weinstein Company

  • Todd Haynes – Carol
  • Alejandro González Iñárritu – The Revenant
  • Tom McCarthy – Spotlight
  • George Miller – Mad Max: Fury Road
  • Ridley Scott – The Martian
  • Steven Spielberg – Bridge of Spies

NOT NOMINATED: Best Director
Quentin Tarantino, “The Hateful Eight”
David O. Russell, “Joy”
Danny Boyle, “Steve Jobs”
John Crowley, “Brooklyn”
Lenny Abrahamson, “Room”

This is a category that has people talking every year, but I’m not sure where the room is here, unless we get rid of the “always nominated,” and maybe we should. If Ridley Scott, or Steven Spielberg make a movie, that’s all you need to know. Many might think the same is almost always true of Quentin Tarantino, David O. Russell, and Danny Boyle, but that locks up the category, and you never had to see a film to get there. Something has to give.

One of the problems with snub talk in this category is that people rarely make a serious effort to disconnect Best Director from Best Picture. I liked that movie better than that one, therefore…

Where real snub talk gets tricky here is that this is the exact same list as the GGs, plus there’s the addition of Steven Spielberg. That makes snub talk a difficult thing. Of the “Not Nominated,” assuming we’re really looking at direction, Brooklyn has the most claim to a snub. Of those that were nominated, only Scott and Spielberg are serious possibilities for who shouldn’t be there, and that isn’t a conversation that’s likely to get far.

 

BEST ORIGINAL SCREENPLAY

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  • Matt Charman and Ethan Coen & Joel Coen – Bridge of Spies
  • Alex Garland – Ex Machina
  • Quentin Tarantino – The Hateful Eight
  • Pete Docter, Meg LeFauve, Josh Cooley – Inside Out
  • Josh Singer and Tom McCarthy – Spotlight

NOT NOMINATED: Best Original Screenplay
“Joy”
“Trainwreck”
“Love and Mercy”
“Son of Saul”
“Suffragette”

Screenplays aren’t often the stuff of much snub uproar, but it is an interesting year for nominations, and I wonder how well these two categories will predict the Oscar noms. Animated films do not often show up in Screenplay categories, and sci-fi efforts aren’t that common either. Joy might have had a shot if more critics loved the film, but nothing here has a serious case for a true snub.

 

BEST ADAPTED SCREENPLAY

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  • Charles Randolph and Adam McKay – The Big Short
  • Nick Hornby – Brooklyn
  • Drew Goddard – The Martian
  • Emma Donoghue – Room
  • Aaron Sorkin – Steve Jobs

NOT NOMINATED: Best Adapted Screenplay
“Carol”
“The Revenant”
“Anomalisa”
“Mad Max: Fury Road”
“The Danish Girl”

This one does open the door for discussion, but it’s a year where this one is pretty heavy. Carol feels the most like a snub, and it should be in there, if I’m really being honest. The Danish Girl is a worthy contender as well, and I’m glad to have people talking about Anomalisa. The Revenant is also going to have its serious fans, but I’m ok with that one being overlooked in this particular category.

Again, the problem is that something had to get nominated that wasn’t really worthy. The obvious possibility is Steve Jobs, because if you don’t love it, then you probably think the screenplay went goofy. That is pretty much the same as saying that some people think that it’s fresh and worthwhile though, so there’s the rub. Slightly less obvious is The Martian, as the potential next lowest rung on the ladder, because I’m open to the idea that it perhaps isn’t exceptional insofar as specifically looking at the screenplay.

Still, even though I would certainly champion Carol, this still feels more like too many good choices, as opposed to something truly being snubbed.

 

BEST CINEMATOGRAPHY

photo: 20th Century Fox

photo: 20th Century Fox

  • Carol – Ed Lachman
  • The Hateful Eight – Robert Richardson
  • Mad Max: Fury Road – John Seale
  • The Martian – Dariusz Wolski
  • The Revenant – Emmanuel Lubezki
  • Sicario – Roger Deakins

No one cares enough to call a lot of the remaining categories snubs, and these are the right picks anyway.

 

BEST PRODUCTION DESIGN

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  • Bridge of Spies – Adam Stockhausen, Rena DeAngelo
  • Brooklyn – François Séguin, Jennifer Oman and Louise Tremblay
  • Carol – Judy Becker, Heather Loeffler
  • The Danish Girl – Eve Stewart, Michael Standish
  • Mad Max: Fury Road – Colin Gibson
  • The Martian – Arthur Max, Celia Bobak

I’m partial to the subtlety and dedication to detail of The Danish Girl here, but what a crazy bag of movies. How you’re supposed to legitimately compare these films to each other, much less everything else, is beyond me.

 

BEST EDITING

photo: Kimberly French/20th Century Fox

photo: Kimberly French/20th Century Fox

  • The Big Short – Hank Corwin
  • Mad Max: Fury Road – Margaret Sixel
  • The Martian – Pietro Scalia
  • The Revenant – Stephen Mirrione
  • Spotlight – Tom McArdle

Frankly, there aren’t that many people, who aren’t closely connected to the business, who know how to spot something as being worthy of an award here, which is probably why the GGs don’t bother with the more technical awards, but these are all good choices, and no one is going to talk long about a snub. The Revenant, for what it may be worth, is insanely well-edited. Will it win? Who knows? It should probably win for the decade, or at least be in the top three. It could mean back-to-back wins for Mirrione, and obviously it should.

 

BEST COSTUME DESIGN

courtesy FOX Searchlight

courtesy FOX Searchlight

  • Brooklyn – Odile Dicks-Mireaux
  • Carol – Sandy Powell
  • Cinderella – Sandy Powell
  • The Danish Girl – Paco Delgado
  • Mad Max: Fury Road – Jenny Beavan

This one is always hard to pick, though I don’t think there are any snubs. Like Production Design, you’re supposed to compare Carol with Mad Max: Fury Road with Cinderella, and what does that mean, really?

I’m partial to Brooklyn here, but part of me wants Mad Max: Fury Road to win.

 

BEST HAIR & MAKEUP

courtesy The Weinstein Company

courtesy The Weinstein Company

  • Black Mass
  • Carol
  • The Danish Girl
  • The Hateful Eight
  • Mad Max: Fury Road
  • The Revenant

This one is in the same boat, only it’s worse. If you could easily have the direct competition really being between the people who won Syfy‘s Face/Off last year, and the people working the hair on Project Runway, how do you make sense of that competition? Imagine that reality competition show.

As far as trying to make sense of it, and looking at the overall contribution to the aesthetic of the film, I feel like this one is between The Hateful Eight and Mad Max: Fury Road, but this is one that could go anywhere.

 

BEST VISUAL EFFECTS

Jurassic World

In a truly rare award season event, it’s hard to care who wins this one. Leaving aside The Walk, because I’m not sure what that nomination is about really, I’d be surprised if anyone really threw a fit no matter who won this. All the other nominees have good arguments behind them.

 

BEST ANIMATED FEATURE

Inside Out

Disney/Pixar

  • Anomalisa
  • The Good Dinosaur
  • Inside Out
  • The Peanuts Movie
  • Shaun the Sheep Movie

NOT NOMINATED: Best Animated Feature
“Kahlil Gibran’s The Prophet”
“Minions”
“Home”
“When Marnie Was There”
“SponeBob Movie: Sponge Out of Water”

There’s a bit of a story here for potential snubs, especially because I’m not convinced that The Peanuts Movie, or The Good Dinosaur are actually that strong. The problem is that only Kahlil Gibran’s The Prophet, and When Marnie Was There are replacement possibilities. One is a little trickier, though worth a nod, and the other is a Studio Ghibli film that didn’t get nominated, and a lot of people obviously think that’s just bonkers, and they’re right.

The real problem is that no one cares that much, and only Inside Out matters.

 

BEST ACTION MOVIE

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  • Furious 7
  • Jurassic World
  • Mad Max: Fury Road
  • Mission Impossible: Rogue Nation
  • Sicario

We’re obviously outside the realm of snubs here, though some might still complain. It’s a little too easy here though, because once you have serious contenders for Best Picture showing up, all bets are off on what’s got a real chance to win. Well, you’d think.

 

BEST ACTOR IN AN ACTION MOVIE

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  • Daniel Craig – Spectre
  • Tom Cruise – Mission Impossible: Rogue Nation
  • Tom Hardy – Mad Max: Fury Road
  • Chris Pratt – Jurassic World
  • Paul Rudd – Ant-Man

This is a two-horse race, and Craig is fresher in most people’s minds. Paul Rudd is kind of hilarious though, which almost makes the whole category worthwhile in itself.

 

BEST ACTRESS IN AN ACTION MOVIE

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  • Emily Blunt – Sicario
  • Rebecca Ferguson – Mission Impossible: Rogue Nation
  • Bryce Dallas Howard – Jurassic World
  • Jennifer Lawrence – The Hunger Games: Mockingjay – Part 2
  • Charlize Theron – Mad Max: Fury Road

This becomes it’s own weird spin at this point. People love Jennifer Lawrence, and the franchise, but this one is between Theron and Blunt, and it’s just an odd twist of fate. Theron gets the nom for Best Actress, and Blunt is considered a snub, and now they battle it out here. Theron could win overall, but get beat here… who knows?

 

BEST COMEDY

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  • The Big Short
  • Inside Out
  • Joy
  • Sisters
  • Spy
  • Trainwreck

Because these aren’t the “serious” categories, no one is going to complain much, but things have gotten a little lost here, and it’s the Golden Globes‘ fault. Studios put their films forward as Comedy or Drama for GG purposes, and then they want that to spill over, and it seems that’s especially true this year, as we’ve gone to the Movie and TV format. Thus, for example, you get things like Disney/Pixar suggesting Inside Out for Comedy, but what they mean is really that they hope it will be up for a Best Picture GG nom, and it isn’t a drama. It’s all GG-oriented.

Of the nominees here, only Sisters, Spy, and Trainwreck are actually comedies, and Spy isn’t funny. I’d like this to go to Trainwreck, but you never know, and I suppose there’s some chance Joy could win, and then wouldn’t it be great when we look like idiots.

 

BEST ACTOR IN A COMEDY

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  • Christian Bale – The Big Short
  • Steve Carell – The Big Short
  • Robert De Niro – The Intern
  • Bill Hader – Trainwreck
  • Jason Statham – Spy

Again, do with this category what you will. Only Trainwreck and Spy are actually comedies, so whatever you think of the other actors mentioned, or their performances, I can’t get behind them winning, and really hope they don’t. Of the other two, I’m fine with either, especially in what was a pretty dull year for comedies. Spy might not have been good, but Statham was awesome in it, so I’ll give him that.

 

BEST ACTRESS IN A COMEDY

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  • Tina Fey – Sisters
  • Jennifer Lawrence – Joy
  • Melissa McCarthy – Spy
  • Amy Schumer – Trainwreck
  • Lily Tomlin – Grandma

I’d almost give you Tomlin, but I can’t really. Lawrence is great, but the comedy thing… not so much. I’m really hoping Schumer can hold onto the hype she managed earlier in the year, but Tina Fey is good as well. McCarthy wasn’t good.

 

BEST SCI-FI/HORROR MOVIE

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  • Ex Machina
  • It Follows
  • Jurassic World
  • Mad Max: Fury Road
  • The Martian

This can be a weird category in the best of years, and this wasn’t the best of years. Oddly, it’s because there were too many good sci-fi movies. I didn’t even rate Ex Machina that highly, and it’s the fourth best movie on this list, but it is also the best sci-fi movie on the list. So, figure that out. Hard to imagine it won’t go to Mad Max though.

 

BEST FOREIGN LANGUAGE FILM

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  • The Assassin
  • Goodnight Mommy
  • Mustang
  • The Second Mother
  • Son of Saul

It’s a little early for people to start calling out snubs for Foreign Language, because that’s just how it usually goes, but Golden Globe nominees: The Brand New Testament, The Club, and The Fencer aren’t on this list, and that’s unusual.

The foreign film game usually solidifies as far as nominations go, and it will be interesting to see where this goes when the Oscar noms roll around. Son of Saul seems to have the most people talking about it at this point, but these are all really good films. I’m partial to The Assassin and The Second Mother, but Son of Saul is awesome.

 

BEST DOCUMENTARY FEATURE

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  • Amy
  • Cartel Land
  • Going Clear: Scientology and the Prison of Belief
  • He Named Me Malala
  • The Look of Silence
  • Where to Invade Next

There is often a big push for something here, and this year it seems that no one is really talking a lot about the documentaries. None of them are quite PC enough, or are the wrong kind of PC, or whatever. They’re all strong, but He Named Me Malala probably has the most attention at this point. It’s very good, but they all are. Well, one of them isn’t really, but I’ll let you decide which that is.

 

BEST SONG

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  • Fifty Shades of Grey – Love Me Like You Do
  • Furious 7 – See You Again
  • The Hunting Ground – Til It Happens To You
  • Love & Mercy – One Kind of Love
  • Spectre – Writing’s on the Wall
  • Youth – Simple Song #3

There are often some songs that are considered to have been snubbed, but I’m not sure a lot of songs have a great case outside of these. It was, as far as I’m concerned, an odd year here as well. It’s almost like the movies forgot they were supposed to be pushing things for this category. These are all decent, except for “Writing’s on the Wall,” which is the worst Bond song ever, and certainly not a good song generally. The clear winner ought to be Simple Song #3 though, and not just because it’s awesome, but because it works for the film, as Best Song contenders should. There is a strong case for One Kind of Love though, and for similar reasons.

 

BEST SCORE


  • Carol – Carter Burwell
  • The Hateful Eight – Ennio Morricone
  • The Revenant – Ryuichi Sakamoto and Alva Noto
  • Sicario – Johann Johannsson
  • Spotlight – Howard Shore

Score is always a category that ends up either being practically random, or has one definite lock. These are all very strong scores, and the world of scores has taken off the last decade or so, with better and better scores every year. I advise taking a listen to Carter Burwell’s effort, but these are all good. I have a feeling Morricone might get it, and I can’t say he wouldn’t deserve it.

 

 

TELEVISION


 

BEST ACTOR IN A COMEDY SERIES

the-grinder-fox-tv-2

  • Anthony Anderson – Black-ish – ABC
  • Aziz Ansari – Master of None – Netflix
  • Will Forte – The Last Man on Earth – Fox
  • Randall Park – Fresh Off the Boat – ABC
  • Fred Savage – The Grinder – Fox
  • Jeffrey Tambor – Transparent – Amazon

 

BEST ACTOR IN A DRAMA SERIES

the-knick-clive-owen-2

  • Hugh Dancy – Hannibal – NBC
  • Rami Malek – Mr. Robot – USA
  • Clive Owen – The Knick – Cinemax
  • Liev Schreiber – Ray Donovan – Showtime
  • Justin Theroux – The Leftovers – HBO
  • Aden Young – Rectify – Sundance

 

BEST ACTOR IN A MOVIE MADE FOR TELEVISION OR LIMITED SERIES

CR: Chris Large/FX

CR: Chris Large/FX

  • Wes Bentley – American Horror Story: Hotel – FX Networks
  • Martin Clunes – Arthur & George – PBS
  • Idris Elba – Luther – BBC America
  • Oscar Isaac – Show Me a Hero – HBO
  • Vincent Kartheiser – Saints & Strangers – National Geographic Channel
  • Patrick Wilson – Fargo – FX Networks

 

BEST ACTRESS IN A COMEDY SERIES

youre-the-worst-season-2-1

  • Rachel Bloom – Crazy Ex-Girlfriend – The CW
  • Aya Cash – You’re the Worst – FX Networks
  • Wendi McLendon-Covey – The Goldbergs – ABC
  • Gina Rodriguez – Jane the Virgin – The CW
  • Tracee Ellis Ross – Black-ish – ABC
  • Constance Wu – Fresh Off the Boat – ABC

 

BEST ACTRESS IN A DRAMA SERIES

unreal-tv-3

  • Shiri Appleby – UnREAL – Lifetime
  • Carrie Coon – The Leftovers – HBO
  • Viola Davis – How to Get Away With Murder – ABC
  • Eva Green – Penny Dreadful – Showtime
  • Taraji P. Henson – Empire – Fox
  • Krysten Ritter – Jessica Jones – Netflix

 

BEST ACTRESS IN A MOVIE MADE FOR TELEVISION OR LIMITED SERIES

flesh-and-bone-hay-3

  • Kathy Bates – American Horror Story: Hotel – FX Networks
  • Kirsten Dunst – Fargo – FX Networks
  • Sarah Hay – Flesh and Bone – Starz
  • Alyvia Alyn Lind – Dolly Parton’s Coat of Many Colors – NBC
  • Rachel McAdams – True Detective – HBO
  • Shanice Williams – The Wiz Live! – NBC

 

BEST COMEDY SERIES

youre-the-worst-season-2-fxx-8

  • Black-ish – ABC
  • Catastrophe – Amazon
  • Jane the Virgin – The CW
  • Master of None – Netflix
  • The Last Man on Earth – Fox
  • Transparent – Amazon
  • You’re the Worst – FX Networks

 

BEST DRAMA SERIES

rectify-series-2

  • Empire – Fox
  • Mr. Robot – USA
  • Penny Dreadful – Showtime
  • Rectify – Sundance
  • The Knick – Cinemax
  • The Leftovers – HBO
  • UnREAL – Lifetime

 

BEST GUEST ACTOR/ACTRESS IN A COMEDY SERIES

transparent

  • Ellen Burstyn – Mom – CBS
  • Anjelica Huston – Transparent – Amazon
  • Cherry Jones – Transparent – Amazon
  • Jenifer Lewis – Black-ish – ABC
  • Timothy Olyphant – The Grinder – Fox
  • John Slattery – Wet Hot American Summer: First Day of Camp – Netflix

 

BEST GUEST ACTOR/ACTRESS IN A DRAMA SERIES

manhattan-tv

  • Richard Armitage – Hannibal – NBC
  • Justin Kirk – Manhattan – WGN America
  • Patti LuPone – Penny Dreadful – Showtime
  • Margo Martindale – The Good Wife – CBS
  • Marisa Tomei – Empire – Fox
  • B.D. Wong – Mr. Robot – USA

 

BEST MOVIE MADE FOR TELEVISION OR LIMITED SERIES

CR: Chris Large/FX

CR: Chris Large/FX

  • Childhood’s End – Syfy
  • Fargo – FX Networks
  • Luther – BBC America
  • Saints & Strangers – National Geographic Channel
  • Show Me a Hero – HBO
  • The Wiz Live! – NBC

 

BEST SUPPORTING ACTOR IN A COMEDY SERIES

brooklyn-nine-nine-braugher-1

  • Andre Braugher – Brooklyn Nine-Nine – Fox
  • Jaime Camil – Jane the Virgin – The CW
  • Jay Duplass – Transparent – Amazon
  • Neil Flynn – The Middle – ABC
  • Keegan-Michael Key – Playing House – USA
  • Mel Rodriguez – Getting On – HBO

 

BEST SUPPORTING ACTOR IN A DRAMA SERIES

high-castle

  • Clayne Crawford – Rectify – Sundance
  • Christopher Eccleston – The Leftovers – HBO
  • Andre Holland – The Knick – Cinemax
  • Jonathan Jackson – Nashville – ABC
  • Rufus Sewell – The Man in the High Castle – Amazon
  • Christian Slater – Mr. Robot – USA

 

BEST SUPPORTING ACTOR IN A MOVIE MADE FOR TELEVISION OR LIMITED SERIES

fargo-offerman-3

  • David Alan Grier – The Wiz Live! – NBC
  • Ne-Yo – The Wiz Live! – NBC
  • Nick Offerman – Fargo – FX Networks
  • Jesse Plemons – Fargo – FX Networks
  • Raoul Trujillo – Saints & Strangers – National Geographic Channel
  • Bokeem Woodbine – Fargo – FX Networks

 

BEST SUPPORTING ACTRESS IN A COMEDY SERIES

youre-the-worst-fxx-season-2-3

  • Mayim Bialik – The Big Bang Theory – CBS
  • Kether Donohue – You’re the Worst – FX Networks
  • Allison Janney – Mom – CBS
  • Judith Light – Transparent – Amazon
  • Niecy Nash – Getting On – HBO
  • Eden Sher – The Middle – ABC

 

BEST SUPPORTING ACTRESS IN A DRAMA SERIES

unreal-tv-6

  • Ann Dowd – The Leftovers – HBO
  • Regina King – The Leftovers – HBO
  • Helen McCrory – Penny Dreadful – Showtime
  • Hayden Panettiere – Nashville – ABC
  • Maura Tierney – The Affair – Showtime
  • Constance Zimmer – UnREAL – Lifetime

 

BEST SUPPORTING ACTRESS IN A MOVIE MADE FOR TELEVISION OR LIMITED SERIES

fargo-season-2-jean

  • Mary J. Blige – The Wiz Live! – NBC
  • Laura Haddock – Luther – BBC America
  • Cristin Milioti – Fargo – FX Networks
  • Sarah Paulson – American Horror Story: Hotel – FX Networks
  • Winona Ryder – Show Me a Hero – HBO
  • Jean Smart – Fargo – FX Networks

 

BEST ANIMATION SERIES

courtesy Netflix

courtesy Netflix

  • Bob’s Burgers – Fox
  • BoJack Horseman – Netflix
  • South Park – Comedy Central
  • Star Wars Rebels – Disney XD
  • The Simpsons – Fox

 

BEST REALITY SHOW – COMPETITION

(Photo by: Jordin Althaus/Syfy)

(Photo by: Jordin Althaus/Syfy)

  • Chopped – Food Network
  • Face Off – Syfy
  • MasterChef Junior – Fox
  • Survivor – CBS
  • The Amazing Race – CBS
  • The Voice – NBC

 

BEST REALITY SHOW HOST

chopped-ted-allen

  • Ted Allen – Chopped – Food Network
  • Phil Keoghan – The Amazing Race – CBS
  • James Lipton – Inside the Actors Studio – Bravo
  • Jane Lynch – Hollywood Game Night – NBC
  • Jeff Probst – Survivor – CBS
  • Gordon Ramsay – Hell’s Kitchen – Fox

 

BEST STRUCTURED REALITY SHOW

INSIDE THE ACTORS STUDIO -- Pictured: Matthew McCounaghey --

(Photo by: Tony Behar/Bravo)

  • Antiques Roadshow – PBS
  • Inside The Actors Studio – Bravo
  • MythBusters – Discovery
  • Project Greenlight – HBO
  • Shark Tank – ABC
  • Undercover Boss – CBS

 

BEST TALK SHOW

(Photo by: Douglas Gorenstein/NBC)

(Photo by: Douglas Gorenstein/NBC)

  • Jimmy Kimmel Live! – ABC
  • Last Week Tonight with John Oliver – HBO
  • The Daily Show with Jon Stewart – Comedy Central
  • The Graham Norton Show – BBC America
  • The Late Late Show with James Corden – CBS
  • The Tonight Show Starring Jimmy Fallon – NBC

 

BEST UNSTRUCTURED REALITY SHOW

anthony-bourdain-parts-unknown-2

  • Anthony Bourdain: Parts Unknown – CNN
  • Cops – Spike
  • Deadliest Catch – Discovery
  • Intervention – A&E
  • Naked and Afraid – Discovery
  • Pawn Stars – History

 


Notable Film Multi-Nominatees

 

THE BIG SHORT (7)
Best Picture
Best Acting Ensemble
Best Adapted Screenplay – Charles Randolph and Adam McKay
Best Editing – Hank Corwin
Best Comedy
Best Actor In A Comedy – Christian Bale
Best Actor In A Comedy – Steve Carell

BRIDGE OF SPIES (5)
Best Picture
Best Supporting Actor – Mark Rylance
Best Director – Steven Spielberg
Best Original Screenplay – Matt Charman and Ethan Coen & Joel Coen
Best Production Design – Adam Stockhausen, Rena DeAngelo

BROOKLYN (5)
Best Picture
Best Actress – Saoirse Ronan
Best Adapted Screenplay – Nick Hornby
Best Production Design – François Séguin, Jennifer Oman and Louise Tremblay
Best Costume Design – Odile Dicks-Mireaux

CAROL (9)
Best Picture
Best Actress – Cate Blanchett
Best Supporting Actress – Rooney Mara
Best Director – Todd Haynes
Best Cinematography – Ed Lachman
Best Production Design – Judy Becker, Heather Loeffler
Best Costume Design – Sandy Powell
Best Hair and Makeup
Best Score – Carter Burwell

THE DANISH GIRL (5)
Best Actor – Eddie Redmayne
Best Supporting Actress – Alicia Vikander
Best Production Design – Eve Stewart, Michael Standish
Best Costume Design – Paco Delgado
Best Hair and Makeup

EX MACHINA (3)
Best Original Screenplay – Alex Garland
Best Visual Effects
Best Sci-Fi/Horror Movie

THE HATEFUL EIGHT (6)
Best Supporting Actress – Jennifer Jason Leigh
Best Acting Ensemble
Best Original Screenplay – Quentin Tarantino
Best Cinematography – Robert Richardson
Best Hair and Makeup
Best Score – Ennio Morricone

INSIDE OUT (3)
Best Original Screenplay – Pete Docter, Meg LeFauve, Josh Cooley
Best Animated Feature
Best Comedy

JURASSIC WORLD (5)
Best Visual Effects
Best Action Movie
Best Actor In An Action Movie – Chris Pratt
Best Actress In An Action Movie – Bryce Dallas Howard
Best Sci-Fi/Horror Movie

MAD MAX: FURY ROAD (13)
Best Picture
Best Actress – Charlize Theron
Best Director – George Miller
Best Cinematography – John Seale
Best Production Design – Colin Gibson
Best Editing – Margaret Sixel
Best Costume Design – Jenny Beavan
Best Hair and Makeup
Best Visual Effects
Best Action Movie
Best Actor In An Action Movie – Tom Hardy
Best Actress In An Action Movie – Charlize Theron
Best Sci-Fi/Horror Movie

THE MARTIAN (9)
Best Picture
Best Actor – Matt Damon
Best Director – Ridley Scott
Best Adapted Screenplay – Drew Goddard
Best Cinematography – Dariusz Wolski
Best Production Design – Arthur Max, Celia Bobak
Best Editing – Pietro Scalia
Best Visual Effects
Best Sci-Fi/Horror Movie

THE REVENANT (9)
Best Picture
Best Actor – Leonardo DiCaprio
Best Supporting Actor – Tom Hardy
Best Director – Alejandro González Iñárritu
Best Cinematography – Emmanuel Lubezki
Best Editing – Stephen Mirrione
Best Hair and Makeup
Best Visual Effects
Best Score – Ryuichi Sakamoto and Alva Noto

ROOM (4)
Best Picture
Best Actress – Brie Larson
Best Young Actor/Actress – Jacob Tremblay
Best Adapted Screenplay – Emma Donoghue

SICARIO (5)
Best Picture
Best Cinematography – Roger Deakins
Best Action Movie
Best Actress In An Action Movie – Emily Blunt
Best Score – Johann Johannsson

SPOTLIGHT (8)
Best Picture
Best Supporting Actor – Mark Ruffalo
Best Supporting Actress – Rachel McAdams
Best Acting Ensemble
Best Director – Tom McCarthy
Best Original Screenplay – Josh Singer and Tom McCarthy
Best Editing – Tom McArdle
Best Score – Howard Shore

STEVE JOBS (3)
Best Actor – Michael Fassbender
Best Supporting Actress – Kate Winslet
Best Adapted Screenplay – Aaron Sorkin

TRAINWRECK (3)
Best Comedy
Best Actor In A Comedy – Bill Hader
Best Actress In A Comedy – Amy Schumer

TRUMBO (3)
Best Actor – Bryan Cranston
Best Supporting Actress – Helen Mirren
Best Acting Ensemble

 

NOMINEES BY NETWORK FOR THE 21st ANNUAL CRITICS’ CHOICE AWARDS (more than 2)

ABC – 14
FX Networks – 14
HBO – 14
FOX – 12
NBC – 11
CBS – 10
Amazon – 8
Showtime – 6
Netflix – 5
USA – 5
BBC America – 4
The CW – 4
Cinemax – 3
Discovery – 3
Lifetime – 3
National Geographic Channel – 3
Sundance – 3

 

 


Marc has been a film and television critic for over 15 years. He is a member of the BFCA and founding member of the BTJA. He has degrees in Philosophy and Secondary Education and a father of three.


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